DRAPERIES FOR ARCHED WINDOWS. ARCHED WINDOWS

DRAPERIES FOR ARCHED WINDOWS. SINAR SHUTTER. PLANTATION SHUTTERS PRICE.

Draperies For Arched Windows September 17, 2011

DRAPERIES FOR ARCHED WINDOWS. SINAR SHUTTER. PLANTATION SHUTTERS PRICE.

Draperies For Arched Windows

draperies for arched windows

    draperies

  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
  • (drapery) curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
  • A curtain (sometimes known as a drape, mainly in the United States) is a piece of cloth intended to block or obscure light, or drafts, or water in the case of a shower curtain. Curtains hung over a doorway are known as portieres.
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • (drapery) cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds

    windows

  • A computer operating system with a graphical user interface
  • (trademark) an operating system with a graphical user interface
  • (window) a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
  • (window) a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened

    arched

  • constructed with or in the form of an arch or arches; “an arched passageway”
  • Have the curved shape of an arch
  • Provide (a bridge, building, or part of a building) with an arch
  • Form or cause to form the curved shape of an arch
  • arced: forming or resembling an arch; “an arched ceiling”
  • An arch is a structure that spans a space while supporting weight (e.g. a doorway in a stone wall). Arches appeared as early as the 2nd millennium BC in Mesopotamian brick architecture and their systematic use started with the Ancient Romans who were the first to apply the technique to a wide

draperies for arched windows – Umbra Bayview

Umbra Bayview Drapery Rod System for Bay Windows, Black
Umbra Bayview Drapery Rod System for Bay Windows, Black
Hang drapery panels for simple, full coverage of a bay window using the Bayview drapery rod system from Umbra. This complete kit includes three 5/8-inch (1-1/2 cm) diameter telescoping metal rods, two cast-metal ball finials, two flexible rubber corner connectors, six mounting brackets, and installation hardware. Center rod extends from 36 to 54-inch (91 – 137 cm); right and left rods extend from 20 to 36-inch (51 – 91 cm). Choose from a variety of finishes to compliment virtually any interior decor. Drapery panels not included. Designed by Michelle Ivankovic for Umbra – the worldwide leader in casual, contemporary and affordable design for the home.

The Century Building

The Century Building
Union Square, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Century Building is a rare surviving Queen Anne style commercial building in New York City. Designed by William Schickel and built in 1880-81, it has been a major presence in Union Square for over a century.

Schickel, a German-born architect who practiced in New York, rose to prominence as a leading late-19th century designer of churches and institutional buildings in the United States. He designed the Century Building as a speculative venture for his major clients, the owners of the Arnold Constable department stores.

Schickel designed the Century Building in the Queen Anne style, an English import defined by a picturesque use of 17th- and 18th-century motifs. More usually associated in this country with residential architecture, the Queen Anne was also used in commercial buildings, but few of these survive in New York City.

The Century is an unusually handsome example of the Queen Anne, notable particularly for its richly carved stonework, its two-story oriel window, its gairforel roof framed by massive chimney stacks, and its terra-cotta details including sunflowers, the trademark of the style.

For over three decades the building housed the Century Publ ishing Company, publishers of the Century and St. Nicholas magazines. The Century was considered by many critics to be one of the finest general periodicals in the world during the last two decades of the 19th century.

Today, the Century Building survives as one of the most picturesque structures in New York, and is a physical reminder of one of New York’s 19th-century literary giants.

The Development of Union Square

At the beginning of the 19th century as New York entered a period of expansion that would lead to its emergence as the largest and richest city in the country, it was realized that some means was needed to control growth and clearly establish property boundaries so that titles could be transferred.

Accordingly in 1807, the New York State Legislature appointed a commission to survey the city north of present-day Houston Street and to lay out streets, roads, and public squares.

Although the new streets were generally planned in a rectangular grid, certain established roads were allowed to retain their traditional orientation. John Randall, Jr., chief surveyor for the Commission, recalled that at the time of the survey, the Bowery met Broadway at 16th Street forming an acute angle "which when further intersected by the streets crossing it left so small an amount of ground for building purposes that the commissioners instructed me to lay out the ground, at the Union of those streets and roads, for a public square, which from that circumstance they named Union Place."

Initially Union Place extended from 10th to 17th Streets. However, city officials soon objected to keeping so much potentially valuable real estate undeveloped and untaxed and in 1812 recommended that Union Place be "discountinued."

The state legislature did not go so far, but did reduce the size of the area in 1814. Then, as the city expanded northward and land use intensified, the need for open spaces became apparent. In 1831, at the urging of local residents, Union Place was set aside as a public space.

A year later, additional land was acquired to regularize the area into a "parallelogram something after the plan of the Rue de la Paix and the Place Vendome." Graded, paved, and fenced, Union Square Park opened to the public in July 1839. Three years later it received its first principal adornment, a fountain supplied by the waters of the newly opened Croton Aqueduct. Within ten years, the square was surrounded by fashionable residences including some of the most splendid mansions in the city.

On 17th Street, north of the Square, in the block where the Century Building now stands, were the homes of Henry Parish, Henry Young, Daniel Miller and Dr. William Moffat. All of these were four-story Italianate houses, built between 1847 and 1851 on lots at least 28 feet wide that extended through the block to 18th Street.

In 1853, the Everett House, an elegant hotel catering to a first-class clientele, was constructed on the northwest corner of 17th Street and Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue South). Soon a number of hotels followed and these in turn brought shops and theaters. By the end of the Civil War, many of the mansions on the Square had been converted to first-class boarding houses or stores.

It was during this transitional period, in spring 1867, that Aaron Arnold, founder of the Arnold Constable Department Store, acquired the two properties west of the Everett House which were to become the site of the Century Building.

Arnold Constable & Company and Real Estate Development

When Aaron Arnold (1794-1876) purchased the Union Square properties in 1867, his company was one of the oldest and most prestigious drygoods firms in the city. ^ Born on the Isle of Wig

The Century Building

The Century Building
Union Square, Manhattan, New York City, New York

The Century Building is a rare surviving Queen Anne style commercial building in New York City. Designed by William Schickel and built in 1880-81, it has been a major presence in Union Square for over a century.

Schickel, a German-born architect who practiced in New York, rose to prominence as a leading late-19th century designer of churches and institutional buildings in the United States. He designed the Century Building as a speculative venture for his major clients, the owners of the Arnold Constable department stores.

Schickel designed the Century Building in the Queen Anne style, an English import defined by a picturesque use of 17th- and 18th-century motifs. More usually associated in this country with residential architecture, the Queen Anne was also used in commercial buildings, but few of these survive in New York City.

The Century is an unusually handsome example of the Queen Anne, notable particularly for its richly carved stonework, its two-story oriel window, its gairforel roof framed by massive chimney stacks, and its terra-cotta details including sunflowers, the trademark of the style.

For over three decades the building housed the Century Publ ishing Company, publishers of the Century and St. Nicholas magazines. The Century was considered by many critics to be one of the finest general periodicals in the world during the last two decades of the 19th century.

Today, the Century Building survives as one of the most picturesque structures in New York, and is a physical reminder of one of New York’s 19th-century literary giants.

The Development of Union Square

At the beginning of the 19th century as New York entered a period of expansion that would lead to its emergence as the largest and richest city in the country, it was realized that some means was needed to control growth and clearly establish property boundaries so that titles could be transferred.

Accordingly in 1807, the New York State Legislature appointed a commission to survey the city north of present-day Houston Street and to lay out streets, roads, and public squares.

Although the new streets were generally planned in a rectangular grid, certain established roads were allowed to retain their traditional orientation. John Randall, Jr., chief surveyor for the Commission, recalled that at the time of the survey, the Bowery met Broadway at 16th Street forming an acute angle "which when further intersected by the streets crossing it left so small an amount of ground for building purposes that the commissioners instructed me to lay out the ground, at the Union of those streets and roads, for a public square, which from that circumstance they named Union Place."

Initially Union Place extended from 10th to 17th Streets. However, city officials soon objected to keeping so much potentially valuable real estate undeveloped and untaxed and in 1812 recommended that Union Place be "discountinued."

The state legislature did not go so far, but did reduce the size of the area in 1814. Then, as the city expanded northward and land use intensified, the need for open spaces became apparent. In 1831, at the urging of local residents, Union Place was set aside as a public space.

A year later, additional land was acquired to regularize the area into a "parallelogram something after the plan of the Rue de la Paix and the Place Vendome." Graded, paved, and fenced, Union Square Park opened to the public in July 1839. Three years later it received its first principal adornment, a fountain supplied by the waters of the newly opened Croton Aqueduct. Within ten years, the square was surrounded by fashionable residences including some of the most splendid mansions in the city.

On 17th Street, north of the Square, in the block where the Century Building now stands, were the homes of Henry Parish, Henry Young, Daniel Miller and Dr. William Moffat. All of these were four-story Italianate houses, built between 1847 and 1851 on lots at least 28 feet wide that extended through the block to 18th Street.

In 1853, the Everett House, an elegant hotel catering to a first-class clientele, was constructed on the northwest corner of 17th Street and Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue South). Soon a number of hotels followed and these in turn brought shops and theaters. By the end of the Civil War, many of the mansions on the Square had been converted to first-class boarding houses or stores.

It was during this transitional period, in spring 1867, that Aaron Arnold, founder of the Arnold Constable Department Store, acquired the two properties west of the Everett House which were to become the site of the Century Building.

Arnold Constable & Company and Real Estate Development

When Aaron Arnold (1794-1876) purchased the Union Square properties in 1867, his company was one of the oldest and most prestigious drygoods firms in the city. ^ Born on the Isle of Wight in 1794, Arn

draperies for arched windows

draperies for arched windows

Window Treatments Idea Book (Taunton Home Idea Books)
One of the first things you do when you remodel or move into a new home is change the curtains. After all, new window treatments easily, quickly, and inexpensively transform a room. They turn an outdated room into one you want to spend time in, and they make a cold space feel warm and inviting. In the style of the best-selling Idea Books, Window Treatments Idea Book offers the latest ideas for decorating all types of windows, from standard to custom. More than 350 photos provide inspiration for all rooms in the house, from the kitchen to the bathroom, bedroom to family room and study. Recognizing that consumers also want to make easy enhancements to readily available window treatments and hardware, the inspiration is peppered with practical advice on how to quickly modify off-the-shelf window treatments and design tricks for hanging them. The breadth of information makes this book the one source homeowners need when picking out window treatments.

The authors’ combined years of experience have allowed them to select photos of the most popular window treatment styles as well as to provide ideas for dealing with challenging windows–bays, bows, and the like. Unique features of the book include showing one window treatment style in three different looks and quick and easy ideas for instant style.

Whether you’re looking to update an existing space or are starting from scratch in a new home or newly designed addition, you’ll find all the inspiration and know-how you need to create the windows of your dreams.

Window Treatments Idea Book should be a goldmine for consumers because it shows so many styles of window treatments, particularly for large, odd-shaped, and custom windows so prevalent today, in photos. What the reader gets is a wide range of window treatments in the context of every room in the house. There is also a one-page reference in the front of the book that lists each room in the house with the page number of treatments that are shown in those room contexts.

 

 
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